Cry Baby

Text and director René Pollesch
Set Barbara Steiner
Costumes Tabea Braun
Choir Leader Christine Groß
Stage Lightning Cornelia Gloth
Dramaturgy Anna Heesen, Bernd Isele
World premiere
8 September 2018, Deutsches Theater
Christine Groß
Judith Hofmann
Bernd Moss
Sophie Rois
Barbara Colceriu, Aysima Ergün, Therese Lösch, Sarah Quarshie, Milena Schedle, Stella Sticher, Beatrix Strobel, Julia Zupanc (Studentinnen aus dem 2. Studienjahr Schauspiel der Hochschule für Schauspielkunst "Ernst Busch" Berlin)Choir
Lea BeieChoir
Josephine LangeChoir
Charlotte MednanskyChoir
Thea RascheChoir
Barbara Colceriu, Aysima Ergün, Therese Lösch, Sarah Quarshie, Milena Schedle, Stella Sticher, Beatrix Strobel, Julia Zupanc (Studentinnen aus dem 2. Studienjahr Schauspiel der Hochschule für Schauspielkunst "Ernst Busch" Berlin), Lea Beie, Josephine Lange, Charlotte Mednansky, Thea Rasche
Choir
Deutschlandfunk Kultur
André Mumot, 08.09.2018
And again it is Sophie Rois who rolls around the stage in a very nimble, motorised bed, sweeps away any mawkishness with charm and wildness and who is allowed to let off steam to her heart’s content in her inimitable, choleric frenzy. Supported and complemented by a quieter, but sharply eloquent Judith Hofmann, by Pollesch veteran Christine Groß and a wonderful Bernd Moss, who occasionally acts the outraged spectator demanding “proper theatre”.

Cry Baby, like the best Pollesch productions of the past, offers a game in a game, soliloquies by the theatre artists between the curtains, fencing duels and virtuoso interventions by the girls’ choir, which is made up of drama students and a hyper-modern hot-shot team and firing squad rolled into one. Pollesch mixes Buñuel and Kleist’s Friedrich von Homburg into a fast-paced pyjama party of metatexts, lets his performers talk about failure and about geniuses, about careerists and Udo Lindenberg. [...]

A start to the season that could hardly be more refreshing, energetic and hopeful. Definitely no reason to cry.
And again it is Sophie Rois who rolls around the stage in a very nimble, motorised bed, sweeps away any mawkishness with charm and wildness and who is allowed to let off steam to her heart’s content in her inimitable, choleric frenzy. Supported and complemented by a quieter, but sharply eloquent Judith Hofmann, by Pollesch veteran Christine Groß and a wonderful Bernd Moss, who occasionally acts the outraged spectator demanding “proper theatre”.

Cry Baby, like the best Pollesch productions of the past, offers a game in a game, soliloquies by the theatre artists between the curtains, fencing duels and virtuoso interventions by the girls’ choir, which is made up of drama students and a hyper-modern hot-shot team and firing squad rolled into one. Pollesch mixes Buñuel and Kleist’s Friedrich von Homburg into a fast-paced pyjama party of metatexts, lets his performers talk about failure and about geniuses, about careerists and Udo Lindenberg. [...]

A start to the season that could hardly be more refreshing, energetic and hopeful. Definitely no reason to cry.
Der Tagesspiegel
Rüdiger Schaper, 10.09.2018
A thousand trains of thought that begin above all in Sophie Rois and never reach a conclusion. She is the shining light in the nightgown. With that voice, which often seems to break off and yet emphatically probes every word, with those glances that can shoot sentences into undreamt-of orbits. [...] A thousand trains of thought that begin above all in Sophie Rois and never reach a conclusion. She is the shining light in the nightgown. With that voice, which often seems to break off and yet emphatically probes every word, with those glances that can shoot sentences into undreamt-of orbits. [...]
Süddeutsche Zeitung
Peter Laudenbach, 10.09.2018
Sophie Rois and René Pollesch triumph with "Cry Baby". [...]  Sophie Rois and René Pollesch triumph with "Cry Baby". [...] 
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Irene Bazinger, 11.09.2018
As an author, Pollesch has all the ideas, fantasies and cross-references securely in his hands, and as a director, all the artistry of the stage at his fingertips. Between tradition and illusion, between emotional truths and intellectual sleights of hand, he develops his beautiful, convincingly condensed production with an
outstanding ensemble. [...]
As an author, Pollesch has all the ideas, fantasies and cross-references securely in his hands, and as a director, all the artistry of the stage at his fingertips. Between tradition and illusion, between emotional truths and intellectual sleights of hand, he develops his beautiful, convincingly condensed production with an
outstanding ensemble. [...]
The New York Times
A.J. Goldmann, 21.09.2018
"Cry Baby" is Mr. Pollesch’s first work in Berlin since a failed changing of the guard at the Volksbühne, and it takes place at another storied playhouse: the Deutsches Theater. In an 18th-century boudoir that becomes a stage within a stage thanks to Barbara Steiner’s set, the actress Sophie Rois (another Volksbühne exile) and her three co-stars discuss the motivations and desires of actors, the expectations of the theatergoing audience and individuality versus groupthink. The setting lends the play the breezy feel of French Boulevard theater, although the hallmarks of that genre — love, adultery, crime — seem to have played out before the play’s beginning, when Ms. Rois shuffles onstage and plops onto the bed.

The rapid-fire dialogue is peppered with quotations, ranging from the German playwright Heinrich von Kleist to the Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, and the talk careens free-associatively from Brechtian aesthetics to German pop music. There’s also a gaggle of pajama-clad girls, reciting their dialogue in unison like a Greek chorus, who at one stage crawl into Ms. Rois’s bed.

Bernd Moss, a lanky, expressive actor in the Deutsches Theater’s ensemble, is Ms. Rois’s chief interlocutor, heckling or at least provoking her as an onstage spectator, and swashbuckling his way around the stage with her in a long fencing duel. Mr. Pollesch divides the text and action into discrete scenes with his eclectic soundtrack of Roy Orbison and flamenco guitar.

As for Ms. Rois, she is charismatic and captivating as she switches between theatrical registers, embracing a spectrum from classic declamation to guttural whining reminiscent of Gollum in "Lord of the Rings." [...]
"Cry Baby" is Mr. Pollesch’s first work in Berlin since a failed changing of the guard at the Volksbühne, and it takes place at another storied playhouse: the Deutsches Theater. In an 18th-century boudoir that becomes a stage within a stage thanks to Barbara Steiner’s set, the actress Sophie Rois (another Volksbühne exile) and her three co-stars discuss the motivations and desires of actors, the expectations of the theatergoing audience and individuality versus groupthink. The setting lends the play the breezy feel of French Boulevard theater, although the hallmarks of that genre — love, adultery, crime — seem to have played out before the play’s beginning, when Ms. Rois shuffles onstage and plops onto the bed.

The rapid-fire dialogue is peppered with quotations, ranging from the German playwright Heinrich von Kleist to the Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel, and the talk careens free-associatively from Brechtian aesthetics to German pop music. There’s also a gaggle of pajama-clad girls, reciting their dialogue in unison like a Greek chorus, who at one stage crawl into Ms. Rois’s bed.

Bernd Moss, a lanky, expressive actor in the Deutsches Theater’s ensemble, is Ms. Rois’s chief interlocutor, heckling or at least provoking her as an onstage spectator, and swashbuckling his way around the stage with her in a long fencing duel. Mr. Pollesch divides the text and action into discrete scenes with his eclectic soundtrack of Roy Orbison and flamenco guitar.

As for Ms. Rois, she is charismatic and captivating as she switches between theatrical registers, embracing a spectrum from classic declamation to guttural whining reminiscent of Gollum in "Lord of the Rings." [...]

What's on

With English surtitles
Kammerspiele
19.00 - 20.10
With English surtitles
by Andres Veiel in collaboration with Jutta Doberstein
Director: Andres Veiel
Follow-up discussion with Katja Kipping
(chairwoman Die Linke) and Andres Veiel,
Moderation: Ulrike Herrmann
Deutsches Theater
20.00 - 21.45

Nurejews Hund – oder
Was Sehnsucht vermag

von Elke Heidenreich
Lesung mit Simone von Zglinicki und Das schöne Quartett
Bar
20.30 - 21.45