Submission (Unterwerfung)

based on the novel by Michel Houellebecq
Costumes Sigi Colpe
Lights Robert Grauel
Dramaturgy David Heiligers
Premiere April 22, 2016
Lorna IshemaNurse/Marie-Françoise Tanneur, colleague at University/reporter/Marine Le Pen, Front National/Myriam, student and ex-girlfriend
Camill JammalChief physician/Mohammed Ben Abbes
Marcel KohlerZivi/Lempereur/Reporter
Wolfgang Pregler
Steven ScharfFrançois, Literature professor
Nurse/Marie-Françoise Tanneur, colleague at University/reporter/Marine Le Pen, Front National/Myriam, student and ex-girlfriend
Chief physician/Mohammed Ben Abbes
Zivi/Lempereur/Reporter
François, Literature professor
Die Deutsche Bühne
Detlev Baur, 23.04.2016
(…) in Berlin director Stephan Kimmig and dramaturg David Heiligers make daring and sharp incisions into the textual structure of the novel, ignore the chronology and to a large extent eschew narrative passages. With this by far most well-thought-out and stage-appropriate version of the text, they create the foundation for a very convincing as well as shattering evening. (…) in Berlin director Stephan Kimmig and dramaturg David Heiligers make daring and sharp incisions into the textual structure of the novel, ignore the chronology and to a large extent eschew narrative passages. With this by far most well-thought-out and stage-appropriate version of the text, they create the foundation for a very convincing as well as shattering evening.
Berliner Zeitung
Dirk Pilz, 25.04.2016
Submission, at the Deutsches Theater, is therefore a sober, almost restrained evening. Amidst the current overheated debates, in which you arouse suspicion if you don’t criticise Islam, it is a remarkable statement. A hasty, superficial sizing-up of the production may come to the conclusion that it lacks a clear standpoint. But this isn’t the case. Rather it uses the freedom not to rashly form an opinion, but instead tries to grasp what it means to be human. Submission, at the Deutsches Theater, is therefore a sober, almost restrained evening. Amidst the current overheated debates, in which you arouse suspicion if you don’t criticise Islam, it is a remarkable statement. A hasty, superficial sizing-up of the production may come to the conclusion that it lacks a clear standpoint. But this isn’t the case. Rather it uses the freedom not to rashly form an opinion, but instead tries to grasp what it means to be human.
die tageszeitung
Simone Kaempf, 25.04.2016
With its seductive extremism, its metaphysical voids and main character in need of salvation, Submission is attractive for theatre with its politically loaded themes. Houellebecq’s first-person narrator, who slowly drifts into Islam, gives an insight into the inner life of a frustrated western European intellectual. (…)
Scharf comes onto the stage wearing nerdy glasses and a brown leather blouson. He blurts out scraps of monologue about survival, praying, loathing of life, in which he seems hardly to believe in himself. He leaves no doubt that the person speaking here is a geek who has lost all contact with the outside world. He comes across as a big child that once played too much on his computer and now – naïve, lonely and frustrated – is lain down on a hospital bed. This metal bed stands right in the centre of the stage. Scharf lies there for longer periods, physically reduced to the smallest radius. The isolation of the individual, and the crumbling away of emotional and social support, feature heavily in the works of director Kimmig. Submission seamlessly joins the ranks of these other works, as a psychogram of a breakdown. Like scientists in a laboratory, the audience watches how the human species is abandoned to its metaphysical suffering."
With its seductive extremism, its metaphysical voids and main character in need of salvation, Submission is attractive for theatre with its politically loaded themes. Houellebecq’s first-person narrator, who slowly drifts into Islam, gives an insight into the inner life of a frustrated western European intellectual. (…)
Scharf comes onto the stage wearing nerdy glasses and a brown leather blouson. He blurts out scraps of monologue about survival, praying, loathing of life, in which he seems hardly to believe in himself. He leaves no doubt that the person speaking here is a geek who has lost all contact with the outside world. He comes across as a big child that once played too much on his computer and now – naïve, lonely and frustrated – is lain down on a hospital bed. This metal bed stands right in the centre of the stage. Scharf lies there for longer periods, physically reduced to the smallest radius. The isolation of the individual, and the crumbling away of emotional and social support, feature heavily in the works of director Kimmig. Submission seamlessly joins the ranks of these other works, as a psychogram of a breakdown. Like scientists in a laboratory, the audience watches how the human species is abandoned to its metaphysical suffering."

What's on

based on the novel by Wolfgang Herrndorf
Kammerspiele
19.00 - 21.00