10 Commandments (10 Gebote)

A contemporary investigation by 15 authors, 9 actors and 1 sheep
With texts and videos by Maxim Drüner (K.I.Z)/Juri Sternburg, Sherko Fatah, Nino Haratischwili, Navid Kermani, Bernadette Knoller/Anja Läufer/Claudia Trost, Dea Loher, Clemens Meyer, Rocko Schamoni, Jochen Schmidt, Jan Soldat, Mark Terkessidis, Felicia Zeller
Director Jette Steckel
Matthias Vogel, Marcel Braun, Matthias Lunow
Dramaturgy Anika Steinhoff
World premiere on January 21, 2017
Markus Graf
Judith Hofmann
Lorna Ishema
Ole Lagerpusch
Benjamin Lillie
Wiebke Mollenhauer
Helmut Mooshammer
Andreas Pietschmann
Natali Seelig
Hamburger Abendblatt
Heinrich Oehmsen, 06.02.2017
The pop journalist Mark Terkessidis gets Ole Lagerpusch and Wiebke Mollenhauer to say funny things about political correctness, the organic food business and the self-righteousness of the educated upper class to the disco song ''Love Shack'' by the B-52s. Nino Haratischwili’s adultery scene with its surprising end is also powerfully performed by Hofmann, Mooshammer and Pietschmann; the dialogue conceived by K.I.Z. rapper Maxim Drüner and the dramatist Juri Sternburg for the commandment ''Thou shalt not steal'', has a Loriot-like quality. The pop journalist Mark Terkessidis gets Ole Lagerpusch and Wiebke Mollenhauer to say funny things about political correctness, the organic food business and the self-righteousness of the educated upper class to the disco song ''Love Shack'' by the B-52s. Nino Haratischwili’s adultery scene with its surprising end is also powerfully performed by Hofmann, Mooshammer and Pietschmann; the dialogue conceived by K.I.Z. rapper Maxim Drüner and the dramatist Juri Sternburg for the commandment ''Thou shalt not steal'', has a Loriot-like quality.
Donaukurier
Raphael Engert, 06.02.2017
''Thou shalt not kill!'', ''Thou shalt not steal!'', ''Thou shalt not lie!''
How familiar these sentences sound to us. They are so firmly rooted in our culture and human interaction that we seldom think about their origins, let alone question them. But in fact it is far from obvious that ten more or less simple rules, which were established several thousand years ago, still have such a huge influence on human coexistence. But the ravages of time – to which many once unquestioned customs have fallen victim – have had relatively little impact on the Ten Commandments; most of them are still regarded as absolute moral values. But what relevance do rules such as ''Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s house!'' have in an age in which we are flooded on a daily basis with advertising and it has become more and more normal to be available ''24/7''.

This is the question that the director Jette Steckel addresses together with her ensemble and 15 contemporary artists. The Deutsches Theater Berlin has developed it into ''a contemporary investigation by 15 authors, 9 actors and 1 sheep'', which places the Ten Commandments at its centre and asks what significance they can still have or should have in our society. Writers, dramatists and film-makers have dealt with one Commandment each. [...]
In its entirety, the evening is pulled off heterogeneously. But the Ensemble uses this heterogeneity, takes it to an extreme and always manages to make us reflect on our medialised experience of everyday life.

A ''space to think'' is thereby created in the theatre – a dense network of borrowings from the Bible, everyday situations, the grotesque, and allusions to current events. The audience is forced to think – they have no other choice. What does the commandment not to steal mean in a globalised world, in which we buy things cheaply every day at the expense of people in far-off countries? What value does the ''truth'' have in times where a U.S. President refers to alternative facts? And what else is the commandment on adultery than a relict from a long-lost past?

Of course, the four-hour evening in the theatre has no clear answers to these questions, and it doesn’t even try to provide any. But in times in which we are regularly told how important it is to defend our own values, it reminds us that we need to assure ourselves of and question our values from time to time, before we have the right to make them the norm and orientation for others.
''Thou shalt not kill!'', ''Thou shalt not steal!'', ''Thou shalt not lie!''
How familiar these sentences sound to us. They are so firmly rooted in our culture and human interaction that we seldom think about their origins, let alone question them. But in fact it is far from obvious that ten more or less simple rules, which were established several thousand years ago, still have such a huge influence on human coexistence. But the ravages of time – to which many once unquestioned customs have fallen victim – have had relatively little impact on the Ten Commandments; most of them are still regarded as absolute moral values. But what relevance do rules such as ''Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s house!'' have in an age in which we are flooded on a daily basis with advertising and it has become more and more normal to be available ''24/7''.

This is the question that the director Jette Steckel addresses together with her ensemble and 15 contemporary artists. The Deutsches Theater Berlin has developed it into ''a contemporary investigation by 15 authors, 9 actors and 1 sheep'', which places the Ten Commandments at its centre and asks what significance they can still have or should have in our society. Writers, dramatists and film-makers have dealt with one Commandment each. [...]
In its entirety, the evening is pulled off heterogeneously. But the Ensemble uses this heterogeneity, takes it to an extreme and always manages to make us reflect on our medialised experience of everyday life.

A ''space to think'' is thereby created in the theatre – a dense network of borrowings from the Bible, everyday situations, the grotesque, and allusions to current events. The audience is forced to think – they have no other choice. What does the commandment not to steal mean in a globalised world, in which we buy things cheaply every day at the expense of people in far-off countries? What value does the ''truth'' have in times where a U.S. President refers to alternative facts? And what else is the commandment on adultery than a relict from a long-lost past?

Of course, the four-hour evening in the theatre has no clear answers to these questions, and it doesn’t even try to provide any. But in times in which we are regularly told how important it is to defend our own values, it reminds us that we need to assure ourselves of and question our values from time to time, before we have the right to make them the norm and orientation for others.
Berliner Morgenpost
Elisa von Hof, 23.01.2017
These are twelve evenings packed into one, twelve plays woven into one. Because Jette Steckel’s production ''10 Commandments'', which premiered on Saturday at the Deutsches Theater, examines the commandments one by one. [...]

In order to verify if, in our day and age, we can still identify with the Ten Commandments – and in general with a moral code that looks down on failure and demands a great deal of obedience – Jette Steckel has joined forces with 15 authors, including the musicians Rocko Schamoni and Maxim Drüner of K.I.Z. [...]

The play that Steckel brings to the stage is like a hurricane and the audience is in the eye of the storm. You watch everything tear past you, including the stage, which never stops rotating. It holds together the different episodes in a design by Florian Lösche, who created a similar one for Steckel's Sartre piece ''Dirty Hands''. The dark-grey labyrinth keeps on revealing new rooms like secrets, sometimes casting them in light, sometimes in darkness. Nothing is static, everything is possible. Just like the treatment of the Ten Commandments.
These are twelve evenings packed into one, twelve plays woven into one. Because Jette Steckel’s production ''10 Commandments'', which premiered on Saturday at the Deutsches Theater, examines the commandments one by one. [...]

In order to verify if, in our day and age, we can still identify with the Ten Commandments – and in general with a moral code that looks down on failure and demands a great deal of obedience – Jette Steckel has joined forces with 15 authors, including the musicians Rocko Schamoni and Maxim Drüner of K.I.Z. [...]

The play that Steckel brings to the stage is like a hurricane and the audience is in the eye of the storm. You watch everything tear past you, including the stage, which never stops rotating. It holds together the different episodes in a design by Florian Lösche, who created a similar one for Steckel's Sartre piece ''Dirty Hands''. The dark-grey labyrinth keeps on revealing new rooms like secrets, sometimes casting them in light, sometimes in darkness. Nothing is static, everything is possible. Just like the treatment of the Ten Commandments.
neues deutschland
Martin Hatzius, 24.01.2017
''I’m always! Expected! To obey! Everything!'' a rocky rap song blares from the speakers, to which the nine actors dance wildly, while over their heads, illuminated lettering ''Thou shalt'' hangs from above. Later it disappears. As a moral consensus at the root of our society, have the Ten Commandments become obsolete in a day and age when authority figures are no longer accepted, let alone worshipped.
For their ''contemporary investigation'' (as the subtitle of the play calls it), Jette Steckel asked 15 authors to try and answer this question. [...]

As different as the authors are – from the literary family archivist Jochen Schmidt to the dramatist Nino Haratischwili, the East-West border-crosser Sherko Fatah and the filmmaker Bernadette Knoller – their approaches are equally very diverse: here documentary, there narrative, here comic, there bitterly serious. [...]

For the actors it’s a party! Benjamin Lillie, for example, wearing Star Wars pyjamas and launching into a tirade that could only have been written by Clemens Meyer: at a rate of knots he covers not just the first of the commandments, referring to God as ''Mäcloud'' and ''Wolkenmäcki'', but also half of pop-culture history, with a healthy dose of misgiving thrown in. Or Ole Lagerpusch and Wiebke Mollenhauer, he in a Smurf-blue, she in a glittering gold-hooded jumpsuit: they celebrate Mark Terkessidis' political activist dialogue about jealousy (the ninth commandment), with burlesque force, as if this thought-provoking text about our day and age could be danced at a disco. And then there’s lanky Lagerpusch! The way he slips from one role into the next – this is acting at its best.
''I’m always! Expected! To obey! Everything!'' a rocky rap song blares from the speakers, to which the nine actors dance wildly, while over their heads, illuminated lettering ''Thou shalt'' hangs from above. Later it disappears. As a moral consensus at the root of our society, have the Ten Commandments become obsolete in a day and age when authority figures are no longer accepted, let alone worshipped.
For their ''contemporary investigation'' (as the subtitle of the play calls it), Jette Steckel asked 15 authors to try and answer this question. [...]

As different as the authors are – from the literary family archivist Jochen Schmidt to the dramatist Nino Haratischwili, the East-West border-crosser Sherko Fatah and the filmmaker Bernadette Knoller – their approaches are equally very diverse: here documentary, there narrative, here comic, there bitterly serious. [...]

For the actors it’s a party! Benjamin Lillie, for example, wearing Star Wars pyjamas and launching into a tirade that could only have been written by Clemens Meyer: at a rate of knots he covers not just the first of the commandments, referring to God as ''Mäcloud'' and ''Wolkenmäcki'', but also half of pop-culture history, with a healthy dose of misgiving thrown in. Or Ole Lagerpusch and Wiebke Mollenhauer, he in a Smurf-blue, she in a glittering gold-hooded jumpsuit: they celebrate Mark Terkessidis' political activist dialogue about jealousy (the ninth commandment), with burlesque force, as if this thought-provoking text about our day and age could be danced at a disco. And then there’s lanky Lagerpusch! The way he slips from one role into the next – this is acting at its best.

What's on

Today202122232425262728293031February 1234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829March 12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031

The swapped heads

by Thomas Mann
in a version by Barbara Schnitzler
Kammerspiele
11.00
For the last time in this season
A family play by Axel Hacke
Director: Anne Bader
Saal
15.00 - 16.00
Guest performance
In English language
by Jan Guillou
With: Claes Bang
Director: Julie Pauline Wieth
Box
19.00 - 20.05
by René Pollesch
Director: René Pollesch
Deutsches Theater
20.00 - 21.30
With English surtitles
by Ingmar Bergman
Director: Anna Bergmann
Kammerspiele
20.30 - 22.00

Das Hexenlied

A ballad evening by and with Bernd Stempel
Attention change of time:
The performance will start at 21.00 p.m. today.
Bar
21.00 - 22.45