How you talk the game (Ihre Version des Spiels)

by Yasmina Reza
Costumes Anja Rabes
Dramaturgy Juliane Koepp
World Premiere October 2, 2012
Corinna HarfouchNathalie Oppenheim
Katrin WichmannRosanna Ertel-Keval
Alexander KhuonRoland Boulanger
Bernd StempelThe mayor
Nathalie Oppenheim
Rosanna Ertel-Keval
Roland Boulanger
The mayor
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Gerhard Stadelmaier, 04.10.2012
This pure little act conveys not only the utopia of literature, but also the longing to live one’s own life. And it mercifully requests not to be questioned about this any longer. It’s the quietest, loveliest, purest moment in this great, audaciously funny performance. Yasmina Reza was in attendance and applauded the actors, who in turn applauded the author. After all, the evening was all about her work. And it was a wonderful one. This pure little act conveys not only the utopia of literature, but also the longing to live one’s own life. And it mercifully requests not to be questioned about this any longer. It’s the quietest, loveliest, purest moment in this great, audaciously funny performance. Yasmina Reza was in attendance and applauded the actors, who in turn applauded the author. After all, the evening was all about her work. And it was a wonderful one.
Berliner Zeitung
Dirk Pilz, 04.10.2012
Even greater and more admirable however is the artistry of Corinna Harfouch, whose performance is so realistic that cracks appear in her character. She fiddles with her hair, fingers her neon yellow glasses case, rocks around on her neon yellow chair and enunciates every syllable as if she had a plum in her mouth. It’s as if she’s trying to make her Nathalie Oppenheim burst from an overdose of reality, as if surreal fringes were sprouting from the edges of her character, as if being too sharply in focus would turn her into something ghostly and unreal. (…) She generates an emotional magnetic field for characters, making it seem that all the others are just figments of her imagination. As shy and extremely nervous as she is at the start of the discussion with Rosanna; as wounded as she is by this competitive journalist, played by Kathrin Wichmann with the tenacity of a bulldog; or as flattered as she is by the advances of Alexander Khuon’s librarian who borders on caricature -- when this Nathalie blows her top, when she smashes her fists on the table and stays explosively silent, when she marches off the stage and knocks back the red wine – everything around her is just an inalienable part of Nathalie’s world.  (…) And no actress flips out with more finesse than Corinna Harfouch, because no one else finds as many highways and byways to let a situation escalate. It’s a must see. Even greater and more admirable however is the artistry of Corinna Harfouch, whose performance is so realistic that cracks appear in her character. She fiddles with her hair, fingers her neon yellow glasses case, rocks around on her neon yellow chair and enunciates every syllable as if she had a plum in her mouth. It’s as if she’s trying to make her Nathalie Oppenheim burst from an overdose of reality, as if surreal fringes were sprouting from the edges of her character, as if being too sharply in focus would turn her into something ghostly and unreal. (…) She generates an emotional magnetic field for characters, making it seem that all the others are just figments of her imagination. As shy and extremely nervous as she is at the start of the discussion with Rosanna; as wounded as she is by this competitive journalist, played by Kathrin Wichmann with the tenacity of a bulldog; or as flattered as she is by the advances of Alexander Khuon’s librarian who borders on caricature -- when this Nathalie blows her top, when she smashes her fists on the table and stays explosively silent, when she marches off the stage and knocks back the red wine – everything around her is just an inalienable part of Nathalie’s world.  (…) And no actress flips out with more finesse than Corinna Harfouch, because no one else finds as many highways and byways to let a situation escalate. It’s a must see.
Die Welt
Ulrich Weinzierl, 04.10.2012
Corinna Harfouch is quite simply stupendous. Her embarrassment, her fidgetiness, her countless tiny gestures of uneasiness alone -- from the scratching of her feet on upwards -- are fascinating. It’s all done consciously, yet appears perfectly natural. Corinna Harfouch is quite simply stupendous. Her embarrassment, her fidgetiness, her countless tiny gestures of uneasiness alone -- from the scratching of her feet on upwards -- are fascinating. It’s all done consciously, yet appears perfectly natural.
Berliner Morgenpost
Ulrich Weinzierl, 04.10.2012
Reza’s mixed triples turns into a fighting match in the arena, with blood and thunder never far away. But – and this shows Yasmina Reza’s greatness – tender feelings also blossom on this battlefield. The erotic attraction between Nathalie and Roland will flare up during the wild drinking binge at the end. Reza’s tragicomedies are reminiscent of Peer Gynt’s onion: Those who try to peel their way to the core discover that, inexplicably, it’s missing – the enjoyment and artistry are to be found in the bitter, sweet and spicy aroma of its layers. Both are exquisite. Reza’s mixed triples turns into a fighting match in the arena, with blood and thunder never far away. But – and this shows Yasmina Reza’s greatness – tender feelings also blossom on this battlefield. The erotic attraction between Nathalie and Roland will flare up during the wild drinking binge at the end. Reza’s tragicomedies are reminiscent of Peer Gynt’s onion: Those who try to peel their way to the core discover that, inexplicably, it’s missing – the enjoyment and artistry are to be found in the bitter, sweet and spicy aroma of its layers. Both are exquisite.
Märkische Oderzeitung
Irene Bazinger, 04.10.2012
No more than 120 spectators can enjoy each showing of this production and its formidable protagonists: Katrin Wichman’s Rosanna – who epitomizes the arrogance of the literary scene – sits bolt upright and mostly just smirks at people self-importantly. Alexander Khuon’s literary disciple Roland embodies the melancholy and euphoria of provincial life; Sven Lehmann’s boastful mayor babbles away at the subsequent cocktail reception, trying to be the life of the party. And Corinna Harfouch adds a dash of glitz and glamour to this wonderful ensemble. As Natalie, she doesn’t just brilliantly strike the right balance between genius and madness, or between witch and hothouse flower; time and again, she artfully mixes Nathalie’s nervous naivety with sheer pain and bitter sorrow. No more than 120 spectators can enjoy each showing of this production and its formidable protagonists: Katrin Wichman’s Rosanna – who epitomizes the arrogance of the literary scene – sits bolt upright and mostly just smirks at people self-importantly. Alexander Khuon’s literary disciple Roland embodies the melancholy and euphoria of provincial life; Sven Lehmann’s boastful mayor babbles away at the subsequent cocktail reception, trying to be the life of the party. And Corinna Harfouch adds a dash of glitz and glamour to this wonderful ensemble. As Natalie, she doesn’t just brilliantly strike the right balance between genius and madness, or between witch and hothouse flower; time and again, she artfully mixes Nathalie’s nervous naivety with sheer pain and bitter sorrow.
Neues Deutschland
Hans Dieter Schütt, 04.10.2012
At some point during this two hour performance you realize that you can simply watch good actors without ever having to think about the play. As the moderator, Katrin Wichmann is splendid at showing how media types can switch on like a cold light: all smiles and “I’m so happy to see you!” or “What can I do for you?” And then they go and do every nasty thing in the book. Alexander Khuon is the excited organiser of the reading series who’s always in a flap; he fights to keep the evening from going off the rails in a manner that’s both brave and comical. As the Mayor, Sven Lehmann also waxes poetic about his misunderstood life. He talks about Proust and crackers, though appears to confuse the two. At some point during this two hour performance you realize that you can simply watch good actors without ever having to think about the play. As the moderator, Katrin Wichmann is splendid at showing how media types can switch on like a cold light: all smiles and “I’m so happy to see you!” or “What can I do for you?” And then they go and do every nasty thing in the book. Alexander Khuon is the excited organiser of the reading series who’s always in a flap; he fights to keep the evening from going off the rails in a manner that’s both brave and comical. As the Mayor, Sven Lehmann also waxes poetic about his misunderstood life. He talks about Proust and crackers, though appears to confuse the two.

What's on

Open air
by Anna Seghers
Director: Alexander Riemenschneider
Forecourt
20.00 - 21.40