Innocence (Unschuld)

by Dea Loher
Choirmaster Marcus Crome
Dramaturgy John von Düffel
Premiere September 29. 2011
Andreas DöhlerElisio
Peter MoltzenFadoul
Katrin WichmannAbsolut
Gabriele HeinzMrs Habersatt
Michael GerberFather of a killed daughter
Kathleen MorgeneyerMother of a killed daughter
Barbara SchnitzlerMrs Zucker
Olivia GräserRosa
Ingo HülsmannElla
Jürgen HuthHelmut
Kathleen MorgeneyerA young doctor
Fadoul
Absolut
Mrs Habersatt
Father of a killed daughter
Mother of a killed daughter
Mrs Zucker
Helmut
A young doctor
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Gerhard Stadelmaier, 01.10.2011
Under Thalheimer’s direction, the characters are human beings (like something out of Tolstoy): the product of an imagination that doesn’t find people guilty, but gives the guilty a voice. Therein lies greatness. Under Thalheimer’s direction, the characters are human beings (like something out of Tolstoy): the product of an imagination that doesn’t find people guilty, but gives the guilty a voice. Therein lies greatness.
dadp
Peter Claus, 30.09.2011
It’s very poignant when the protagonists perform on the cone-shaped set, whose upper half rotates and which fills the entire stage (designed by Olaf Altmann). Their precarious ‘dance on the volcano‘, called life, becomes a telling metaphor for the prevailing sentiment about day-to-day existence in the Western world. It’s very poignant when the protagonists perform on the cone-shaped set, whose upper half rotates and which fills the entire stage (designed by Olaf Altmann). Their precarious ‘dance on the volcano‘, called life, becomes a telling metaphor for the prevailing sentiment about day-to-day existence in the Western world.
Der Tagesspiegel
Christine Wahl, 01.10.2011
While keeping things firmly in hand, it's clear that Thalheimer gives his performers plenty of leeway to develop their characters in their own way. And the actors take full advantage of this.

Katrin Wichmann does a marvelous job of peeling away all the extravagance from her symbolically-charged blind stripper, bringing her down to earth with a dry laugh. As a former communist with an amputated foot, Barbara Schnitzler shoots off crazed, homicidal fantasies with such accuracy that, at least for this performance, you believe she could blow up gas stations with the sheer force of her words alone. Sven Lehmann’s washer of corpses is like a sleepwalker performing a balancing act, teetering between unhappily married realist and zombie-like freak. And, as the mother who’s lost her child, Kathleen Morgeneyer’s completely limp body suddenly unleashes a torrent of hatred -- directed at her husband (Michael Gerber) – that’s so razor sharp it makes you jump out of your seat.

Ingo Hülsmann manages to endow his philosopher Ella with an exaggerated sense of her own importance, while at the same time sovereignly avoiding all the usual clichés and pitfalls. Even in his most introverted moments, Andreas Döhler’s quiet immigrant Elisio captivates with his exacting and unobtrusive presence. And Peter Moltzen’s weighty and consciously over-the-top interpretation of Fadoul also fits in well with Thalheimer’s concept.
While keeping things firmly in hand, it's clear that Thalheimer gives his performers plenty of leeway to develop their characters in their own way. And the actors take full advantage of this.

Katrin Wichmann does a marvelous job of peeling away all the extravagance from her symbolically-charged blind stripper, bringing her down to earth with a dry laugh. As a former communist with an amputated foot, Barbara Schnitzler shoots off crazed, homicidal fantasies with such accuracy that, at least for this performance, you believe she could blow up gas stations with the sheer force of her words alone. Sven Lehmann’s washer of corpses is like a sleepwalker performing a balancing act, teetering between unhappily married realist and zombie-like freak. And, as the mother who’s lost her child, Kathleen Morgeneyer’s completely limp body suddenly unleashes a torrent of hatred -- directed at her husband (Michael Gerber) – that’s so razor sharp it makes you jump out of your seat.

Ingo Hülsmann manages to endow his philosopher Ella with an exaggerated sense of her own importance, while at the same time sovereignly avoiding all the usual clichés and pitfalls. Even in his most introverted moments, Andreas Döhler’s quiet immigrant Elisio captivates with his exacting and unobtrusive presence. And Peter Moltzen’s weighty and consciously over-the-top interpretation of Fadoul also fits in well with Thalheimer’s concept.
Süddeutsche Zeitung
Lothar Müller, 05.10.2011
The characters don’t flaunt the fact that they come out of nowhere. They simply appear, are there, and leave no ominous void in the background from which they detach themselves. Behind them there’s only a very old theatrical power source: the chorus, once used to comment on the action in tragedies. Every character appears to have just emerged from the chorus; no-one is all on their own. Unlike in a chamber play, here it’s choreography -- not psychology - which sets the tone of the dialogue. The characters don’t flaunt the fact that they come out of nowhere. They simply appear, are there, and leave no ominous void in the background from which they detach themselves. Behind them there’s only a very old theatrical power source: the chorus, once used to comment on the action in tragedies. Every character appears to have just emerged from the chorus; no-one is all on their own. Unlike in a chamber play, here it’s choreography -- not psychology - which sets the tone of the dialogue.
Berliner Morgenpost
Kathrin Pauly, 01.10.2011
The glimmer of hope Michael Thalheimer gives these people is rather faint. He’s wise enough to place all his trust in the text; his directing style is almost invisible and is restricted to adding nuances. Thalheimer turns this play into a wonderfully lucid performance, one that’s positively glowing in all its acuity. The glimmer of hope Michael Thalheimer gives these people is rather faint. He’s wise enough to place all his trust in the text; his directing style is almost invisible and is restricted to adding nuances. Thalheimer turns this play into a wonderfully lucid performance, one that’s positively glowing in all its acuity.

What's on

Open air
by Anna Seghers
Director: Alexander Riemenschneider
Forecourt
20.00 - 21.40
sold out
perh. remaining tickets at evening box office