Iphigenia in Tauris (Iphigenie auf Tauris)

by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Set / Costumes Johannes Schütz
Sound design Martin Person
Stage lighting Robert Grauel
Dramaturgy Claus Caesar
Premiere on October 14, 2016
Kathleen Morgeneyer
Oliver Stokowski
Moritz Grove
Camill Jammal
Barbara Schnitzler
BZ Kultur
Juliane Primus, 15.10.2016
She can smear as much white paint on her face as she likes and walk around in her blossom-white dress – but innocence remains only a mask. Or not? Good. Evil? Kathleen Morgeneyer plays Iphigenia as so wonderfully human that she doesn’t allow any definitive answers.

Director Ivan Panteleev (''Waiting for Godot'') gives Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s text space to breathe in his production at the Deutsches Theater. And the wonderful thing: the actors perform ''Iphigenia in Tauris" so that you can understand every syllable and are brought face to face with our own dayand age.
She can smear as much white paint on her face as she likes and walk around in her blossom-white dress – but innocence remains only a mask. Or not? Good. Evil? Kathleen Morgeneyer plays Iphigenia as so wonderfully human that she doesn’t allow any definitive answers.

Director Ivan Panteleev (''Waiting for Godot'') gives Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s text space to breathe in his production at the Deutsches Theater. And the wonderful thing: the actors perform ''Iphigenia in Tauris" so that you can understand every syllable and are brought face to face with our own dayand age.
Die Welt
Hannah Lühmann, 17.10.2016
Greek mythology certainly has some crazy fictional genealogies on offer! The nerdy meticulousness with which the updated story of the curse on the Tantalids is recounted bears testimony to humans’ determination to create carefully structured stories, precise worlds of actions and origins that have the scope to address their fears. Ivan Panteleev staged ''Iphigenia in Tauris'' at the Deutsches Theater. The Bulgarian director is interesting not least because he apparently did not speak a word of German until he came to Berlin in 2000. His last production at the Deutsches Theater was ''Waiting for Godot'', which was just performed for the fiftieth time. His ''Iphigenia'' is a production that in its absolute minimalism shows what is possible in theatre, that age-old box of wonders: empathising with the beautiful absurdity of mankind. [...]

It is exhilarating to watch how Panteleev and his actors (also wonderful: Barbara Schnitzler as Arkas, confidant of King Thoas) succeed in never letting the Goethe text – which besides the preponderance of white provides the only element of suspense – get boring throughout the entire two hours. This is something that (forgive the old-fashioned sentiment) is all too rare nowadays in the theatre: working with a text to tear back the layers and to pull all the strings.
Greek mythology certainly has some crazy fictional genealogies on offer! The nerdy meticulousness with which the updated story of the curse on the Tantalids is recounted bears testimony to humans’ determination to create carefully structured stories, precise worlds of actions and origins that have the scope to address their fears. Ivan Panteleev staged ''Iphigenia in Tauris'' at the Deutsches Theater. The Bulgarian director is interesting not least because he apparently did not speak a word of German until he came to Berlin in 2000. His last production at the Deutsches Theater was ''Waiting for Godot'', which was just performed for the fiftieth time. His ''Iphigenia'' is a production that in its absolute minimalism shows what is possible in theatre, that age-old box of wonders: empathising with the beautiful absurdity of mankind. [...]

It is exhilarating to watch how Panteleev and his actors (also wonderful: Barbara Schnitzler as Arkas, confidant of King Thoas) succeed in never letting the Goethe text – which besides the preponderance of white provides the only element of suspense – get boring throughout the entire two hours. This is something that (forgive the old-fashioned sentiment) is all too rare nowadays in the theatre: working with a text to tear back the layers and to pull all the strings.
Süddeutsche Zeitung
Peter Laudenbach, 18.10.2016
Panteleev does something that borders on stubborn obstinacy in today’s theatre world: he stages a classic text without commenting on it or trying to prove that the director is in fact cleverer than the playwright. He even engages with the antiquated dramatic verse and Goethe’s human pathos, without irony and without breaking up the cohesive form of the play with unfamiliar text. As he already demonstrated in his ''Waiting for Godot'' production in Berlin and in ''Philoktet'' at the Residenztheater in Munich, Panteleev sticks faithfully to the original: Goethe pure and unabridged: and that, although Iphigenia’s exile (''Wo unto him who leads a lonely life from parents and from kindred'') could be given all sorts of contemporary refugee associations. […]

Even more astonishing than this modest approach to the great classic text is that this ''non-interpretation'' succeeds for the most part thanks to the actors and only rarely (for example in the droning and roaring attacks of Pylades [Camill Jammal]) borders unintentionally on the comic. And the actors can do something that has become almost as rare as the director’s humble approach to the text: they speak in elegant, rhythmic iambs,without mechanically rattling them off. And they believe what they say. [...]

Kathleen Morgeneyer, who shines in all her roles at the Deutsches Theater, succeeds in particular in portraying her character, Iphigenia, in all its subtle hues and thereby breaking out of, so to speak, the corset of this high art form. Oliver Stokowski, who plays King Thoas as a thoughtful farmer, and Moritz Grove as a perennially overheated Orest stand in sharp contrast to the slightly otherworldly Iphigenia.
Panteleev does something that borders on stubborn obstinacy in today’s theatre world: he stages a classic text without commenting on it or trying to prove that the director is in fact cleverer than the playwright. He even engages with the antiquated dramatic verse and Goethe’s human pathos, without irony and without breaking up the cohesive form of the play with unfamiliar text. As he already demonstrated in his ''Waiting for Godot'' production in Berlin and in ''Philoktet'' at the Residenztheater in Munich, Panteleev sticks faithfully to the original: Goethe pure and unabridged: and that, although Iphigenia’s exile (''Wo unto him who leads a lonely life from parents and from kindred'') could be given all sorts of contemporary refugee associations. […]

Even more astonishing than this modest approach to the great classic text is that this ''non-interpretation'' succeeds for the most part thanks to the actors and only rarely (for example in the droning and roaring attacks of Pylades [Camill Jammal]) borders unintentionally on the comic. And the actors can do something that has become almost as rare as the director’s humble approach to the text: they speak in elegant, rhythmic iambs,without mechanically rattling them off. And they believe what they say. [...]

Kathleen Morgeneyer, who shines in all her roles at the Deutsches Theater, succeeds in particular in portraying her character, Iphigenia, in all its subtle hues and thereby breaking out of, so to speak, the corset of this high art form. Oliver Stokowski, who plays King Thoas as a thoughtful farmer, and Moritz Grove as a perennially overheated Orest stand in sharp contrast to the slightly otherworldly Iphigenia.
neues deutschland
Christian Baron, 19.10.2016
A text that cannot be performed in our day and age? I’ll convince you of the opposite! Ivan Panteleev belongs to that line-up of directors who indulge in the paradoxical, the absurd, and in complex ideas. Most recently he put on a splendid production of Samuel Beckett’s ''Waiting for Godot'' at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin. This is also where his latest production is now on the programme. Here, Iphigenia (Kathleen Morgeneyer) is not the beacon of humanism that Goethe originally intended her to be. Instead, an angry young girl plays her fucked-up-ness with modern, cynical fury. And she does it so well, that the staccato-like scenes don’t get on your nerves even after two hours.

This is also because Panteleev makes it clear right from the start what he’s doing: he wants to tear the text apart by taking it seriously in its delivery and satirising it in its presentation. [...] It is impressive how the director stringently follows through on his idea and boldly runs the risk of pulverising the rigidly retold content with a form that contradicts this content. Iphigenia, at the start still naive and gullible, is the only character on stage dressed in white, her fellow actors wear the original colour, which shimmers through in flecks on the wall, table and chairs. You can whitewash the dark side of human nature, but there is no point. Hope emerges here only out of the insight that ''homo sapiens'' are by necessity egotistical. Although so little happens on stage, in their eloquent battle of words which adhere strictly to the iambic pentameters of Goethe’s text, Thoas, Orest, Pylades and the king’s Adjutant Arkas (Barbara Schnitzler), manage to transform ''Iphigenia'' from ''fundis'' to ''realpolitik''. Joschka Fischer would be delighted.
A text that cannot be performed in our day and age? I’ll convince you of the opposite! Ivan Panteleev belongs to that line-up of directors who indulge in the paradoxical, the absurd, and in complex ideas. Most recently he put on a splendid production of Samuel Beckett’s ''Waiting for Godot'' at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin. This is also where his latest production is now on the programme. Here, Iphigenia (Kathleen Morgeneyer) is not the beacon of humanism that Goethe originally intended her to be. Instead, an angry young girl plays her fucked-up-ness with modern, cynical fury. And she does it so well, that the staccato-like scenes don’t get on your nerves even after two hours.

This is also because Panteleev makes it clear right from the start what he’s doing: he wants to tear the text apart by taking it seriously in its delivery and satirising it in its presentation. [...] It is impressive how the director stringently follows through on his idea and boldly runs the risk of pulverising the rigidly retold content with a form that contradicts this content. Iphigenia, at the start still naive and gullible, is the only character on stage dressed in white, her fellow actors wear the original colour, which shimmers through in flecks on the wall, table and chairs. You can whitewash the dark side of human nature, but there is no point. Hope emerges here only out of the insight that ''homo sapiens'' are by necessity egotistical. Although so little happens on stage, in their eloquent battle of words which adhere strictly to the iambic pentameters of Goethe’s text, Thoas, Orest, Pylades and the king’s Adjutant Arkas (Barbara Schnitzler), manage to transform ''Iphigenia'' from ''fundis'' to ''realpolitik''. Joschka Fischer would be delighted.

What's on

Today19202122232425262728293031February 1234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829March 12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031
Meeting point: entrance Kammerspiele
13.30
sold out
perh. remaining tickets at evening box office
A family play by Axel Hacke
Director: Anne Bader
Saal
15.00 - 16.00
sold out
perh. remaining tickets at evening box office
by Sarah Kane
Director: Ulrich Rasche
Deutsches Theater
18.00 - 20.50
Guest performance
In English language
by Jan Guillou
With: Claes Bang
Director: Julie Pauline Wieth
Follow-up discussion – Box
Box
20.00 - 21.05
With English surtitles
by Heiner Müller
Director: Amir Reza Koohestani
Kammerspiele
20.30 - 22.00
20.00 Introduction – Bar