Job (Hiob)

The Story of a Simple Man
by Joseph Roth
Premiere March 31, 2016
Bernd MossMendel Singer
Almut ZilcherDeborah, his wife
Edgar EckertJonas, his son
Camill JammalSchemarjah, his son
Lisa HrdinaMirjam, his daughter
Alexander KhuonMenuchim, his son
Mendel Singer
Deborah, his wife
Jonas, his son
Schemarjah, his son
Mirjam, his daughter
Menuchim, his son
Deutschlandfunk
Michael Laages, 01.04.2016
Deeply moving and evocative theatre

Anne Lenk grants the ensemble little more than one emotional outburst: and this often-told, rarely performed story drives towards it. The tone is unfailingly restrained – you could even say comfortless and chilly, especially when Alexander Khountakes over the narration. He is the epileptic son from the beginning of the play, who has gone on to become a famous concert pianist and who appears before his devastated father Job after his reckoning with God, like the Biblical angelbringing good tidings. Secretly, subcutaneously, without the need forconceptual foregrounding, this production succumbs wholeheartedly to narration […]
And this is the most economical form to be distilled from a very special text whose beauty, strength and scale are illustrated in this show – because the production entrusts more to the text than to itself. Joseph Roth’s vision suddenly becomes clear: in 1930, prior to the second, greater catastrophe of the past century, his text seems to prophesy the suffering caused by the genocide and the terror that was shortly to follow. But there is no concrete image in the heart or soul of Anne Lenk’s deeply moving and evocative theatre: she leaves that to us. These are the heights that theatre can scale.
Deeply moving and evocative theatre

Anne Lenk grants the ensemble little more than one emotional outburst: and this often-told, rarely performed story drives towards it. The tone is unfailingly restrained – you could even say comfortless and chilly, especially when Alexander Khountakes over the narration. He is the epileptic son from the beginning of the play, who has gone on to become a famous concert pianist and who appears before his devastated father Job after his reckoning with God, like the Biblical angelbringing good tidings. Secretly, subcutaneously, without the need forconceptual foregrounding, this production succumbs wholeheartedly to narration […]
And this is the most economical form to be distilled from a very special text whose beauty, strength and scale are illustrated in this show – because the production entrusts more to the text than to itself. Joseph Roth’s vision suddenly becomes clear: in 1930, prior to the second, greater catastrophe of the past century, his text seems to prophesy the suffering caused by the genocide and the terror that was shortly to follow. But there is no concrete image in the heart or soul of Anne Lenk’s deeply moving and evocative theatre: she leaves that to us. These are the heights that theatre can scale.
Deutschlandradio Kultur
André Mumot, 31.03.2016
A two-and-a-half-hour godsend: at the DT, director Anne Lenk turns Joseph Roth’s novel Job into a captivating, stirring stage experience.

“ ‘How is it possible,’ says Bernd Moss as Mendel Singer towards the end, ‘that you can hear the whole world in a song?’ This is one of those sentences that lingers on with astonishing veracity, spoken softly, tentatively and exhaustedly into the darkness of the stage.
[…]

Anne Lenk pulls off a sleight of hand: she takes the sharp prototypes of the characters in the novel and embeds them into something greater and more universal, imbuing them with a liveliness and depth that is both captivating and finely attuned. The play is a celebration of dedicated acting. In order to intensify the feeling of the blows of fate that occur later, she starts by showing great tenderness, joie de vivre and a vibrant family life surrounding Almut Zilcher as the ‘supermother’ Deborah. Zilcher embodies a beaming, chuckling, grief-stricken and then once again euphoric, all-embracing and all-loving centre for her family. Outstandingly good acting also comes from Edgar Eckert, Camill Jammal, Lisa Hrdina and Alexander Khuon.
[…]

The evening is a two-and-a-half-hour godsend of quiet, cleverly concentrated storytelling centred on people – one that shows that the smallest gestures can become great if they are given space. The production moves the audience to observe and listen because it itself pays attention to every rise and fall of the text, every nuance of desperation, the tiniest feeling of happiness, and the slightest look or touch, such as a crutch dragging across the stage or the chuckling noise Alexander Khuon makes with his cheek as an almost speechless Menuchin. It is so quiet that it can barely be heard. You have to hold your breath. But you will never forget it."
A two-and-a-half-hour godsend: at the DT, director Anne Lenk turns Joseph Roth’s novel Job into a captivating, stirring stage experience.

“ ‘How is it possible,’ says Bernd Moss as Mendel Singer towards the end, ‘that you can hear the whole world in a song?’ This is one of those sentences that lingers on with astonishing veracity, spoken softly, tentatively and exhaustedly into the darkness of the stage.
[…]

Anne Lenk pulls off a sleight of hand: she takes the sharp prototypes of the characters in the novel and embeds them into something greater and more universal, imbuing them with a liveliness and depth that is both captivating and finely attuned. The play is a celebration of dedicated acting. In order to intensify the feeling of the blows of fate that occur later, she starts by showing great tenderness, joie de vivre and a vibrant family life surrounding Almut Zilcher as the ‘supermother’ Deborah. Zilcher embodies a beaming, chuckling, grief-stricken and then once again euphoric, all-embracing and all-loving centre for her family. Outstandingly good acting also comes from Edgar Eckert, Camill Jammal, Lisa Hrdina and Alexander Khuon.
[…]

The evening is a two-and-a-half-hour godsend of quiet, cleverly concentrated storytelling centred on people – one that shows that the smallest gestures can become great if they are given space. The production moves the audience to observe and listen because it itself pays attention to every rise and fall of the text, every nuance of desperation, the tiniest feeling of happiness, and the slightest look or touch, such as a crutch dragging across the stage or the chuckling noise Alexander Khuon makes with his cheek as an almost speechless Menuchin. It is so quiet that it can barely be heard. You have to hold your breath. But you will never forget it."
taz
Katrin Bettina Müller, 02.04.2016
Sensitivity to language – Anne Lenk’s Job at the Deutsches Theater

"To bear what cannot be borne, to feel punished: this is Job’s struggle throughout Roth’s novel. His dialogues with God are bitter and yet they are his last refuge. To stage a lament of this sort without using the obvious form of pathos to turn it into caricature is rarely successful. But Bernd Moss pulls it off. To remain close to the language of the novel, which so poetically narrates the suffering of those who lack means of expression both at home and abroad proves to be an opportune construction for the actors. Their sensitivity to language, the way they plumb the depths of every word, is carried out here to its full extent. This not only applies to Moss but also to Alexander Khoun as Menuchim and the other actors."
Sensitivity to language – Anne Lenk’s Job at the Deutsches Theater

"To bear what cannot be borne, to feel punished: this is Job’s struggle throughout Roth’s novel. His dialogues with God are bitter and yet they are his last refuge. To stage a lament of this sort without using the obvious form of pathos to turn it into caricature is rarely successful. But Bernd Moss pulls it off. To remain close to the language of the novel, which so poetically narrates the suffering of those who lack means of expression both at home and abroad proves to be an opportune construction for the actors. Their sensitivity to language, the way they plumb the depths of every word, is carried out here to its full extent. This not only applies to Moss but also to Alexander Khoun as Menuchim and the other actors."

What's on

Open air
by Anna Seghers
Director: Alexander Riemenschneider
Forecourt
20.00 - 21.40
sold out
perh. remaining tickets at evening box office