Milan Peschel plays

münchhausen


/ yes that is possible
/ because it’s a play after all
/ about me
/ well not only
/ but as well
/ for the most part
Director Jan Bosse
Production Design Kathrin Plath
Dramaturgy Ulrich Beck
September 17, 2015 Berlin
May 30, 2015 Ruhrfestspiele Recklinhausen
Co-produktion with Ruhrfestspiele Recklinghausen
Martin Otting
Milan Peschel
Inforadio vom rbb
Ute Büsing, 18.09.2015
Waiting for Münchhausen under the big top
“The way in which Milan Peschel achieves a virtuoso balancing act between banal thoughts, philosophical ideas from Nietzsche’s Zarathustra, and profound reflections on globalisation is simply brilliant. He is convincing as the con man, the diva, the one who has been short-changed, the gigolo. Although directed by Jan Bosse, there is slapstick galore."
Waiting for Münchhausen under the big top
“The way in which Milan Peschel achieves a virtuoso balancing act between banal thoughts, philosophical ideas from Nietzsche’s Zarathustra, and profound reflections on globalisation is simply brilliant. He is convincing as the con man, the diva, the one who has been short-changed, the gigolo. Although directed by Jan Bosse, there is slapstick galore."
Berliner Zeitung
Dirk Pilz, 19.09.2015
Until nothing is embarrassing anymore

“Peschel as Peschel, a prankster play. New definitions are needed: coquettish drama, perhaps, or narro-drama. ‘münchhausen’: a play about acting the fool for the sake of theatre. But the evening is more than just comical. It is incredibly courageous, because it is not secured by the usual ropes of reflectiveness. Peschel plays Peschel as someone who doesn’t trust himself; who is startled by his own transformative abilities, who is a stranger to himself. Brief glances, little pauses – they are what push the production to another level. It turns into a maelstrom that throws you onto precarious terrain. Memories flood in uncontrolled; fears, hopes, doubts.

You can stand on the edge and push everything away. Then this evening is a fun, deviating piece of entertainment, no more. It would be easy to pour scorn on it – a favourite routine of Berlin theatre audiences. But scorn is always a give-away, a protective mechanism, essentially boring. Because beneath the surface of this ‘Peschel piece’ it is churning and bubbling. He says: ‘Just keep on acting until nothing is embarrassing anymore.’  And he does so, out of necessity and for fun in equal measure. This is what makes this production so beguiling: just keep watching yourself and this actor for as long it takes for the game to lose its drollness. It is about the theatre in the here and now. It is about him. It is about me.”
Until nothing is embarrassing anymore

“Peschel as Peschel, a prankster play. New definitions are needed: coquettish drama, perhaps, or narro-drama. ‘münchhausen’: a play about acting the fool for the sake of theatre. But the evening is more than just comical. It is incredibly courageous, because it is not secured by the usual ropes of reflectiveness. Peschel plays Peschel as someone who doesn’t trust himself; who is startled by his own transformative abilities, who is a stranger to himself. Brief glances, little pauses – they are what push the production to another level. It turns into a maelstrom that throws you onto precarious terrain. Memories flood in uncontrolled; fears, hopes, doubts.

You can stand on the edge and push everything away. Then this evening is a fun, deviating piece of entertainment, no more. It would be easy to pour scorn on it – a favourite routine of Berlin theatre audiences. But scorn is always a give-away, a protective mechanism, essentially boring. Because beneath the surface of this ‘Peschel piece’ it is churning and bubbling. He says: ‘Just keep on acting until nothing is embarrassing anymore.’  And he does so, out of necessity and for fun in equal measure. This is what makes this production so beguiling: just keep watching yourself and this actor for as long it takes for the game to lose its drollness. It is about the theatre in the here and now. It is about him. It is about me.”
Deutschlandradio Kultur
Stefan Keim, 30.05.2015
The theatre and its passion for lies

“Peschel works himself up to frenzied moments, whirls around, dances, animates the audience, pulls a member of the audience on stage and tells him old jokes. In between he suddenly deflates, deliberately of course, because it’s about feeling the emptiness that the actor, the fool, the paid liar is expected to fill. (…) The characters are given their own lives, yet Peschel remains recognisable as himself: the physical, passionately playful, changeable and explosive actor. The lie is also a utopia, says Peschel in a reflective moment, an intuition of a better world. (…) A sharp and witty morsel, a playful and thought-provoking gourmet dessert for connoisseurs and those who wish to become connoisseurs.”
The theatre and its passion for lies

“Peschel works himself up to frenzied moments, whirls around, dances, animates the audience, pulls a member of the audience on stage and tells him old jokes. In between he suddenly deflates, deliberately of course, because it’s about feeling the emptiness that the actor, the fool, the paid liar is expected to fill. (…) The characters are given their own lives, yet Peschel remains recognisable as himself: the physical, passionately playful, changeable and explosive actor. The lie is also a utopia, says Peschel in a reflective moment, an intuition of a better world. (…) A sharp and witty morsel, a playful and thought-provoking gourmet dessert for connoisseurs and those who wish to become connoisseurs.”

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With English surtitles
by Heinrich von Kleist
Director: Anne Lenk
Deutsches Theater
20.00 - 21.30