The Miser (Der Geizige)

by Molière
Premiere May 17, 2015
Michael GoldbergHarpagon
Ole LagerpuschCléante
Franziska MachensÉlise
Andreas DöhlerValère
Meike DrosteMariane
Anita VulesicaFrosine
Sebastian GrünewaldLa Flèche / Maître Jacques
Harald BaumgartnerAnselme / Maître Simon
Harpagon
Cléante
Valère
Mariane
Frosine
La Flèche / Maître Jacques
Anselme / Maître Simon
Stage and Screen
Sascha Krieger, 21.05.2015
‘It could have been such a nice evening!’

Laberenz has thrown emotional, social and various other economies into the pot, applied speed and presented it on stage as farce in fast motion. Everything here is over-revved; near hysteria is the new norm. Molière’s characters are hurled into postmodernism with rage in their bellies, not knowing where it comes from or where to go. In Laberenz’s production, it is released in stunning outbursts that collapse the boundary between actors and roles, and yet everything remains an act – or perhaps not. In the process, a squabble over the definition of debtors and creditors escalates into an epic verbal breakdown between the wonderful Ole Lagerpusch and his partners Sebastian Grünewald and Harald Baumgärtner, in which Marx, the ’68 revolution and the precarious existence of actors are debated. (…) Martin Laberenz presents the birth of the angry citizen, created through homespun insecurity, by distorting the mechanisms of daily life into something we recognise. In the programme a text on extravagance by Georges Batailles is discussed. And no, the evening is not tight-fisted: it is wasteful and goes in search of its truth in precisely this rejection of so-called economic reason. Nothing is economical here, and nothing is reasonable, let alone efficient. ‘You have to get away from it all sometimes,’ Grünewald pleads, ‘otherwise everything retards!’ But it is precisely the slowing down of linear progress, in the form of prolonged over-revving, in which the show comes into its own: as an alleged end in itself, as pure theatre of failure, finding its purpose in precisely this failure, and finding its truth in a world that does exactly that without admitting it. ‘It could have been such a nice evening!’ Grünewald shouts back at Döhler in his tirade. At any rate, it was certainly great.”
‘It could have been such a nice evening!’

Laberenz has thrown emotional, social and various other economies into the pot, applied speed and presented it on stage as farce in fast motion. Everything here is over-revved; near hysteria is the new norm. Molière’s characters are hurled into postmodernism with rage in their bellies, not knowing where it comes from or where to go. In Laberenz’s production, it is released in stunning outbursts that collapse the boundary between actors and roles, and yet everything remains an act – or perhaps not. In the process, a squabble over the definition of debtors and creditors escalates into an epic verbal breakdown between the wonderful Ole Lagerpusch and his partners Sebastian Grünewald and Harald Baumgärtner, in which Marx, the ’68 revolution and the precarious existence of actors are debated. (…) Martin Laberenz presents the birth of the angry citizen, created through homespun insecurity, by distorting the mechanisms of daily life into something we recognise. In the programme a text on extravagance by Georges Batailles is discussed. And no, the evening is not tight-fisted: it is wasteful and goes in search of its truth in precisely this rejection of so-called economic reason. Nothing is economical here, and nothing is reasonable, let alone efficient. ‘You have to get away from it all sometimes,’ Grünewald pleads, ‘otherwise everything retards!’ But it is precisely the slowing down of linear progress, in the form of prolonged over-revving, in which the show comes into its own: as an alleged end in itself, as pure theatre of failure, finding its purpose in precisely this failure, and finding its truth in a world that does exactly that without admitting it. ‘It could have been such a nice evening!’ Grünewald shouts back at Döhler in his tirade. At any rate, it was certainly great.”

What's on

Open air
by Anna Seghers
Director: Alexander Riemenschneider
Forecourt
20.00 - 21.40
sold out
perh. remaining tickets at evening box office