The Raspberry Empire (Das Himbeerreich)

by Andres Veiel
Director Andres Veiel
Choirmaster Stefan Streich
Berlin-Premiere January 16, 2013
A co-production with Schauspiel Stuttgart
Susanne-Marie WrageDr. Brigitte Manzinger
Ulrich MatthesGottfried W. Kastein
Joachim BißmeierDr. Dr. hc Walter K. von Hirschstein
Manfred AndraeBertram Ansberger
Sebastian KowskiNiki Modersohn
Jürgen HuthHans Helmut Hinz
Dr. Brigitte Manzinger
Gottfried W. Kastein
Dr. Dr. hc Walter K. von Hirschstein
Manfred Andrae
Bertram Ansberger
Niki Modersohn
Hans Helmut Hinz
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Irene Bazinger, 18.01.2013
He [Andres Veiel] uses the statements of real people merely as material for an artistically poetic commentary on the state of the world that’s as overwhelming as it is shocking. And who other than the ‘Masters of the Universe’, as Tom Wolfe dubbed these figures back in 1987, could provide him with more fitting terminology?
[…]
Eliminating any possible chance for mawkish nodding in agreement, the production is a Black Mass which leads spectators from one circle of Hell to the next and dazes them with chillingly presented visions of crises, collapses and state bankruptcies. Whether or not they’re accurate is irrelevant as the reputedly serious analyses of the financial experts aren’t either. Taken altogether, though, these visions appear thoroughly convincing and match the general public sentiment. Without much theatrical ado, they present a scandalous, never-ending calamity.
[…]
Andres Veiel has developed this inferno of chilling economic irrationality in a manner that’s supremely abstract and transcends the linearity of documentary. While it’s ill-suited to providing lessons, help or consolation, it’s extremely adept at delivering an evil-eyed glimpse into the abyss and this destructive system.
He [Andres Veiel] uses the statements of real people merely as material for an artistically poetic commentary on the state of the world that’s as overwhelming as it is shocking. And who other than the ‘Masters of the Universe’, as Tom Wolfe dubbed these figures back in 1987, could provide him with more fitting terminology?
[…]
Eliminating any possible chance for mawkish nodding in agreement, the production is a Black Mass which leads spectators from one circle of Hell to the next and dazes them with chillingly presented visions of crises, collapses and state bankruptcies. Whether or not they’re accurate is irrelevant as the reputedly serious analyses of the financial experts aren’t either. Taken altogether, though, these visions appear thoroughly convincing and match the general public sentiment. Without much theatrical ado, they present a scandalous, never-ending calamity.
[…]
Andres Veiel has developed this inferno of chilling economic irrationality in a manner that’s supremely abstract and transcends the linearity of documentary. While it’s ill-suited to providing lessons, help or consolation, it’s extremely adept at delivering an evil-eyed glimpse into the abyss and this destructive system.
neues deutschland
Hans Dieter Schütt, 18.01.2013
If Veiel didn’t manage to shoot a documentary based on his interviews with bankers -- because he’d have had to name names and addresses -- then it’s a tribute to the vitality of theatre when it steps in and enables the presentation of this distressing material in fictional form. What’s distressing about the play is the invisible yet horrible smugness of a system which reveals its best-paid slaves to be blind men who lack nothing – except an idea of what’s really going on. If Veiel didn’t manage to shoot a documentary based on his interviews with bankers -- because he’d have had to name names and addresses -- then it’s a tribute to the vitality of theatre when it steps in and enables the presentation of this distressing material in fictional form. What’s distressing about the play is the invisible yet horrible smugness of a system which reveals its best-paid slaves to be blind men who lack nothing – except an idea of what’s really going on.
taz
Katrin Bettina Müller, 18.01.2013
You’re stunned by the candour of this insider’s view from the heart of the financial world. We hear from business leaders who realize – and not just in retrospect – that they were headed for disaster. Rather, they admit that they hurtled towards it with their eyes wide open. But they didn’t change course for fear of losing their status and their Persian rug.
[…]
Ulrich Matthes assumes the role of the skeptic; he’s always looking askance at the system he’s in, as if through the eyes of an outsider – and this fits him to a T. […] The most interesting character is Frau Manziger. Susanne-Marie Wrage doesn’t exaggerate her icy coldness, choosing the rational over the extravagant in her mannerisms as well.
You’re stunned by the candour of this insider’s view from the heart of the financial world. We hear from business leaders who realize – and not just in retrospect – that they were headed for disaster. Rather, they admit that they hurtled towards it with their eyes wide open. But they didn’t change course for fear of losing their status and their Persian rug.
[…]
Ulrich Matthes assumes the role of the skeptic; he’s always looking askance at the system he’s in, as if through the eyes of an outsider – and this fits him to a T. […] The most interesting character is Frau Manziger. Susanne-Marie Wrage doesn’t exaggerate her icy coldness, choosing the rational over the extravagant in her mannerisms as well.
Stuttgarter Zeitung
Roland Müller, 14.01.2013
With surprising obstinacy and impressive insight, Veiel – as writer and director – depicts this downward trajectory in The Raspberry Empire. The way he does it is extremely complex, oscillating between the individual and the systemic, between the concrete and the abstract. And because this constant progression is accompanied by reflection, as the bankers and brokers contemplate their actions, the […] play avoids falling into cliché. Here the stage isn’t populated by theories on two legs, but instead by people who lend the theories their flesh and blood and breathe life into them. In The Raspberry Empire, the whys and wherefores of what we normally perceive as just rising or falling share prices become a sensory experience. With surprising obstinacy and impressive insight, Veiel – as writer and director – depicts this downward trajectory in The Raspberry Empire. The way he does it is extremely complex, oscillating between the individual and the systemic, between the concrete and the abstract. And because this constant progression is accompanied by reflection, as the bankers and brokers contemplate their actions, the […] play avoids falling into cliché. Here the stage isn’t populated by theories on two legs, but instead by people who lend the theories their flesh and blood and breathe life into them. In The Raspberry Empire, the whys and wherefores of what we normally perceive as just rising or falling share prices become a sensory experience.
Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung
Franz Dobler, 13.01.2013
The fabulous actors make extremely complicated sentences instantly understandable – with an emphasis here, a little gesture there. They just blow you away! The fabulous actors make extremely complicated sentences instantly understandable – with an emphasis here, a little gesture there. They just blow you away!
Deutschlandradio
Rainer Zerbst, 11.01.2013
It’s all brilliantly formulated. But what really takes your breath away is the knowledge that this phraseology is real, not fictional. It’s all brilliantly formulated. But what really takes your breath away is the knowledge that this phraseology is real, not fictional.
Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung
Lisa Nienhaus, 13.01.2013
All of the bankers here are people; little by little they let the masks drop and show their feelings – at the very latest when they lose their jobs. One of the best scenes – also because it’s extremely funny – is the one in which the distinguished former board member bemoans the loss of his privileges since being forced to leave the executive suite. Now his office chair only features three adjustment options, and there’s no carpeting or curtains. The only perk left is his driver, but he’s only permitted entry to the staff parking garage. All of the bankers here are people; little by little they let the masks drop and show their feelings – at the very latest when they lose their jobs. One of the best scenes – also because it’s extremely funny – is the one in which the distinguished former board member bemoans the loss of his privileges since being forced to leave the executive suite. Now his office chair only features three adjustment options, and there’s no carpeting or curtains. The only perk left is his driver, but he’s only permitted entry to the staff parking garage.

Funded by

What's on

Open air
by Anna Seghers
Director: Alexander Riemenschneider
Forecourt
20.00 - 21.40
sold out
perh. remaining tickets at evening box office