Berlin Alexanderplatz

based on the novel by Alfred Döblin
Director / Stage Sebastian Hartmann
Light design / Video design Voxi Bärenklau
Video animation Tilo Baumgärtel
Assistant director Yannik Böhmer, Lena Brasch
Artistic director choir Christine Groß
Premiere Mai 12, 2016
Andreas Döhler
Edgar Eckert
Christoph Franken
Michael Gerber
Felix Goeser
Moritz Grove
Gabriele Heinz
Benjamin Lillie
Wiebke Mollenhauer
Markwart Müller-Elmau
Katrin Wichmann
Almut Zilcher
Deutschlandradio Kultur
André Mumot, 12.05.2016
A tour de force of several hours at the Deutsches Theater Berlin: Sebastian Hartmann has brought Alfred Döblin’s classic novel Berlin Alexanderplatz to the stage with lots of sex – and outshines all the other adaptations of recent years.
[…]
Occasionally it is illustrated with beguiling animated films by Tilo Baumgärtel, which lead through Berlin’s alleyways, red-light district and through the Deutsches Theater itself. But the four-and-a-half hours (including two intervals) is sustained by the members of the ensemble, who speak in Berlin dialect, shriek and whine, are tender and sad and loud, and create vignettes with feverish intensity. […] [It] remains an evening that always comprehends and uses theatre as a great art form, as a medium in which life’s ultimate struggles are portrayed in equal measure with fire, passion and clear-headedness. And so one leaves the auditorium like a flogged but very happy dog, with a bursting head, and wild, exploding thoughts.
A tour de force of several hours at the Deutsches Theater Berlin: Sebastian Hartmann has brought Alfred Döblin’s classic novel Berlin Alexanderplatz to the stage with lots of sex – and outshines all the other adaptations of recent years.
[…]
Occasionally it is illustrated with beguiling animated films by Tilo Baumgärtel, which lead through Berlin’s alleyways, red-light district and through the Deutsches Theater itself. But the four-and-a-half hours (including two intervals) is sustained by the members of the ensemble, who speak in Berlin dialect, shriek and whine, are tender and sad and loud, and create vignettes with feverish intensity. […] [It] remains an evening that always comprehends and uses theatre as a great art form, as a medium in which life’s ultimate struggles are portrayed in equal measure with fire, passion and clear-headedness. And so one leaves the auditorium like a flogged but very happy dog, with a bursting head, and wild, exploding thoughts.
nachtkritik.de
Hartmut Krug, 12.05.2016
Sebastian Hartmann presents Berlin Alexanderplatz at the Deutsches Theater as an existential story, as a kind of passion that leads inevitably to the protagonist’s death. We see a dance of death full of biblical and religious iconography. But Hartmann’s stage adaptation of Döblin’s novel does not tell the story in a linear fashion, but selectively, opening it up to associations and allegory.
[...]
Hartmann’s ambitious and strident production, which is open to a variety of interpretations, gains its theatrical power in part because it does not shy away from comedy or from deeper meaning. In fact, it pulls the two together. […] How do humans live and suffer? Is the question posed by this production as well as by Döblin.
Sebastian Hartmann presents Berlin Alexanderplatz at the Deutsches Theater as an existential story, as a kind of passion that leads inevitably to the protagonist’s death. We see a dance of death full of biblical and religious iconography. But Hartmann’s stage adaptation of Döblin’s novel does not tell the story in a linear fashion, but selectively, opening it up to associations and allegory.
[...]
Hartmann’s ambitious and strident production, which is open to a variety of interpretations, gains its theatrical power in part because it does not shy away from comedy or from deeper meaning. In fact, it pulls the two together. […] How do humans live and suffer? Is the question posed by this production as well as by Döblin.
Der Tagesspiegel
Christine Wahl, 13.05.2016
[Director Sebastian Hartmann] circumnavigates [...] not only the danger of naturalistic milieu kitsch, but finds a very unique way of dramatising the novel. […] Right at the start, for example, Andreas Döhler interprets the newly released prisoner as a great dialectician with a politely timid sex drive when he turns up at Minna’s, the sister of the woman who he killed in a fit of jealousy. […]
Later on in this four-and-half-hour production (including two intervals), during which the DT actors are for the most part on best form, Felix Goeser brings a different variation of Biberkopf to the stage.
[Director Sebastian Hartmann] circumnavigates [...] not only the danger of naturalistic milieu kitsch, but finds a very unique way of dramatising the novel. […] Right at the start, for example, Andreas Döhler interprets the newly released prisoner as a great dialectician with a politely timid sex drive when he turns up at Minna’s, the sister of the woman who he killed in a fit of jealousy. […]
Later on in this four-and-half-hour production (including two intervals), during which the DT actors are for the most part on best form, Felix Goeser brings a different variation of Biberkopf to the stage.
Inforadio vom rbb
Ute Büsing, 13.05.2016
It is an intense, four-and-a-half-hour tour de force for the ensemble and the audience. A rewarding feat in black and white. Epic theatre with some spectacular effects, choral moments and popular Berlin songs. Powerfully portrayed: humans’ bestial side and the very small, buffeted little man Franz Biberkopf right at the heart of it – someone who cannot remain a decent human being as he is consumed by this juggernaut of a city. Out of whom Sebastian Hartmann has created a very unique symphony. Expressionistic in the best sense of the word.
[…]
Amazing how everyone on stage acts to the limit: intensive sex and drinking scenes full of despair and angst. […] And again and again: the story of Job. Most touchingly as father and son wrestling with the self-sacrifice demanded by God. Overall, the interaction of young and old is impressive, and on an absolutely equal footing, which is a rare occurrence. […] The intelligent collage Berlin Alexanderplatz […] convincingly asks: why is the human a human? Three cheers!
It is an intense, four-and-a-half-hour tour de force for the ensemble and the audience. A rewarding feat in black and white. Epic theatre with some spectacular effects, choral moments and popular Berlin songs. Powerfully portrayed: humans’ bestial side and the very small, buffeted little man Franz Biberkopf right at the heart of it – someone who cannot remain a decent human being as he is consumed by this juggernaut of a city. Out of whom Sebastian Hartmann has created a very unique symphony. Expressionistic in the best sense of the word.
[…]
Amazing how everyone on stage acts to the limit: intensive sex and drinking scenes full of despair and angst. […] And again and again: the story of Job. Most touchingly as father and son wrestling with the self-sacrifice demanded by God. Overall, the interaction of young and old is impressive, and on an absolutely equal footing, which is a rare occurrence. […] The intelligent collage Berlin Alexanderplatz […] convincingly asks: why is the human a human? Three cheers!
Theater heute
Chistian Rakow, 01.07.2016
In all its cross-references and manifold repetitions, Hartmann delves deep into the world of the novel Berlin Alexanderplatz. Like Döblin, he pits the linear time of the industrial modern age against the circular time of the pre-modern era, in which growth and decay were seen as inextricably intertwined, which perceived every event as a recurrence. A tour de force. In all its cross-references and manifold repetitions, Hartmann delves deep into the world of the novel Berlin Alexanderplatz. Like Döblin, he pits the linear time of the industrial modern age against the circular time of the pre-modern era, in which growth and decay were seen as inextricably intertwined, which perceived every event as a recurrence. A tour de force.

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Guest performance
by Wolfram Lotz
Director: Yannik Böhmer
Follow-up discussion with ensemble and team
Box
19.30
sold out
perh. remaining tickets at evening box office

Von Mainz bis an die Memel CXLI

Ein Videoschnipselvortrag von Kuttner
Deutsches Theater
20.00
With English surtitles
Kammerspiele
20.00 - 22.20